Converting Obstacles to Opportunites: Sponsorship Copy & The Halo Effect

As you consider Michigan Radio sponsorship as a way to promote your business, mission or event, you should also be considering the copy message you’d like to air.

Your copy message is an important consideration: not just any message, but the right kind of message.

An appropriately worded sponsorship message is one that resonates with the listeners and fits in with the sound of the station.

Just as you wouldn’t pair brown shoes with a black tuxedo at a formal event, you don’t want a message that strikes listeners like an out-of-tune piano in a symphony orchestra. You want copy that fits in with the sound of the station.

The things that make Michigan Radio unique in sound and substance are why our listeners tune-in. In addition to providing exceptional programming, it’s important that we maintain an uncluttered environment, so that listeners are engaged during breaks, stay tuned to the station, and hear our sponsor’s messages.

That’s why crafting underwriting messages that are in keeping with our programming values is important.

When it comes time for writing copy, there are important questions to keep in mind:

  • Does the copy focus on brand and community messages instead of just a list of the sponsor’s products?

  • Is the length of the message appropriate?

  • Is the tone appropriate? Is it produced in a calm, authentic voice?

  • Is the copy reinforcing a trust relationship?

We’ll take a look at two ways an sponsorship message can be written for the same sponsor. Here’s an example of a credit for a business that’s in the finance category.

 

The first of the two is a good message, FCC-compliant, and written with the focus on the product:

Support for Michigan Radio comes from Wealth Investment Advisors, providing a wide range of investment options, from stocks, bonds and mutual funds, to comprehensive portfolio management since 1995. On the web at Wealth Investment Advisors dot com.

Here’s a second version, also a good message and FCC-compliant. It’s also a message that’s locally oriented and supportive of the local community:

Support for Michigan Radio comes from Wealth Investment Advisors, helping local families navigate the investment landscape since 1995. On the web at Wealth Investment Advisors dot com.

Both examples are good copy and FCC-compliant. The second is to-the-point, an example that makes for a clear, uncluttered message that resonates with the listener. When fewer words are used, it’s easier for a listener to remember the details, compared with a longer list of product or service offerings.

Information in shorter spots is easier for the listener to remember. That’s a good guide to use when choosing the wording that will resonate with the listener. The second credit is poised to deliver on the halo effect, creating the image of the business that supports the station.

Sponsorship messages should resonate with the listeners. When you’re listening to the radio everything that comes out of the speakers is heard as programming, and that includes the sponsorship messages.

Contact us for more information about how we can help you get your clear, concise message out to our audience with a Michigan Radio sponsorship.