Insights, Not Sound Bites: Building Relationships with Public Radio

The Principles of Public MediaPublic broadcasting includes media outlets that operate as a public service.  Unlike commercial broadcasting, public media is non-profit and operates from donations from private citizens and businesses.*

In previous posts on the principles of public media, we talked about what supporting a strong civil society means to us and how we do it with integrity.

This time we’re going to talk about how important building relationships are to our mission.

We rely on our community to provide us with their perspective, knowledge and experiences and to be a part of the conversations that we are having on a regular basis.  In return, we work hard to be respectful, honest and effective in the services that we provide.

We also rely on our community to support us financially, both personally and with corporate sponsorship.  We understand that businesses need their dollars to work for them, so we make sure that we help you find the best message schedule for your branding or event campaign.

Our account executives aren’t just here to sell air time – we are here because we care about the mission of Michigan Radio. More than that, we care about your business – we want to see you thrive and celebrate your success along side of you!

Click on “The Principles of Public Media” under categories to see more in this series.

Source: http://pmintegrity.org/pm_docs/PrinciplesofPublicMedia_001.pdf

*For more information about where NPR and NPR member stations get their funding, click here.

Insights, Not Soundbites: Serving with Integrity

The Principles of Public MediaPublic broadcasting includes media outlets that operate as a public service.  Unlike commercial broadcasting, public media is non-profit and operates from donations from private citizens and businesses.

In previous posts on the principles of pubic media, we talked about what supporting a strong civil society means to us and how we do it.

This time we’re going to talk about how we maintain our integrity while we serve our community.

In order to continue to build and maintain our reputation as a trusted, reliable and honest source of information, it is essential for us comply with FCC rules in every facet.

This impacts corporate sponsors because the FCC regulates the messages that public media can broadcast about their sponsors, including both the length and content (check out the FCC rules here).

The benefit of these rules is that Michigan Radio and all public media escape the high traffic advertising area of commercial media. Your message doesn’t have to be bigger, better, louder or faster to reach our audience – as Michigan Radio listener’s, they love the uncluttered, subtle support that your corporate sponsorship dollars provide.

Click on “The Principles of Public Media” under categories to see more in this series.

Source: http://pmintegrity.org/pm_docs/PrinciplesofPublicMedia_001.pdf

Insights, Not Sound Bites: How We Serve

The Principles of Public Media

Public broadcasting includes media outlets that operate as a public service.  Unlike commercial broadcasting, public media is non-profit and operates from donations from private citizens and businesses.

In our previous post on the principles of pubic media, we talked about what supporting a strong civil society means to us, as a station.

This time we’re going to talk about how we actually go about doing just that.

Projects and programs like Stateside, The Next Idea, State of Opportunity and The Environment Report are original to Michigan Radio. That means that we research, interview, write and produce these stories right here at the station.

With these programs and projects, we work to engage our listeners in conversation that gets them involved in what is happening in our state, how it impacts each of us and how we can be a part of positive change.

As a corporate sponsor, your dollars help to make these vital programs and projects possible.  Without you we wouldn’t have Issues & Ale discussions, It’s Just Politics or Michigan Watch! We appreciate your support and will keep putting your dollars to work in important ways!

Click on “The Principles of Public Media” under categories to see more in this series.

Source: http://pmintegrity.org/pm_docs/PrinciplesofPublicMedia_001.pdf

Insights, Not Sound Bites: Supporting a Strong Civil Society

The Principles of Public MediaPublic broadcasting includes media outlets that operate as a public service.  Unlike commercial broadcasting, public media is non-profit and operates from donations from private citizens and businesses.

As a public media station, Michigan Radio prides itself on supporting a strong civil society.  Which are fancy words for…what?

To put it simply, we are committed to improving society by providing information that educates, enriches and strengthens.  Unlike commercial news stations, we go beyond the headlines to discuss not only the how and why of events but the ways that we can prevent the negative ones and increase the positive.

Our Mission Statement: Michigan Radio’s mission is to produce and distribute trusted content to inform, educate, and entertain people who care about the State of Michigan and the world around them.

Every level of our organization is focused on this mission from reporters to management to membership. Every decision we make is to move our mission forward.

As a corporate sponsor, your support of our mission lends your organization credibility and lets our listeners know that being a part of a strong civil society is important to you.

Click on “The Principles of Public Media” under categories to see more in this series.

Source: http://pmintegrity.org/pm_docs/PrinciplesofPublicMedia_001.pdf

It’s Not Just the (Lack of) Commercials That Make Us Different

The Principles of Public MediaNot only do commercial and public radio stations sound different from each other, they are also structured in very different ways. While success is measured by ratings and revenue at commercial stations, public radio stations measure their success by community engagement, awards, and impactful programming.

Commercial radio stations are compelled to sell as many advertising spots as possible to keep their stations profitable. Radio advertisements interrupt in traditional, gimmicky and promotional bites you hear on just about every medium, ranging from skeptical weight loss supplements to negative campaign messages every election season.

Public Radio stations are held to higher standard set by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). The sponsorship announcements that we read on-air are required to meet certain guidelines that only identify our sponsors and give a general description of the entity – a clearer and more concise message.

Our corporate revenue model is based on our small team of fundraisers who meet with proprietors and other community entities to give them the opportunity to become a supporting member of our station, just like our 29,000 individual donating members. With their gift, we air messages that inform our listeners of events happening throughout Michigan and opportunities to support businesses that value public broadcasting.

The revenue from both our corporate sponsors and our members is reinvested into the station to ensure the quality programming you hear every day.

Sponsorship messages are read with the listener in mind. With a maximum of two and a half minutes of local underwriting messages read per hour, listeners will hear and understand each credit because of its ability to stand out.  The average commercial radio station airs 9 minutes of advertisements – and up to 26 minutes during peak listening times.

On Michigan Radio, sponsorship messages stand out, corporate sponsors support a public service, and our success is never rooted in revenue.

Our corporate sponsors are see the value in that.